Old Sailors' Almanac

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY

Week 38, 2020

Previous Week   September 14, 2020 - September 20, 2020  Next Week

Wall Street Bombing on September 16, 1920

Wall Street Bombing on September 16, 1920

Wall Street Bombing: On this day in 1920, the lunch rush was just beginning as a non-descript man driving a cart pressed an old horse forward. He stopped the animal and its heavy load in front of the U.S. Assay Office, across from the J. P. Morgan building in the heart of Wall Street. The driver got down and quickly disappeared into the crowd.

Within minutes, the cart exploded into a hail of metal fragments - immediately killing more than 30 people and injuring some 300. The carnage was horrific, and the death toll kept rising as the day wore on and more victims succumbed.

If Lower Manhattan’s Financial District was the center of American capitalism in the 1920s, then the southeast corner of Wall and Broad Streets was its most important junction. It was dominated by the headquarters of J.P. Morgan and Co., a financial leviathan that had come out of World War I as the most influential banking institution on the globe. Across the street stood the U.S. Sub-Treasury and the Assay Office. The bustling New York Stock Exchange was located just down the road.

Wall Street Bombing on September 16, 1920

Rain was in the forecast for September 16, 1920, but as the bells of nearby Trinity Church rang in the noonday hour, “the Corner” was its usual hive of activity. Bank clerks and stockbrokers swarmed around the building fronts, and the streets were clogged with automobiles and messenger boys. Few in the lunchtime crowd paid any notice to the battered horse-drawn wagon parked in front of the Assay Office, nor the driver that had anxiously dropped the reigns and hurried off down the street.

The final ring of the church bells was still hanging in the air at 12:01, when the 100 pounds of dynamite concealed in the wagon detonated with an ear-splitting roar. “That was the loudest noise I ever heard in my life,” J.P. Morgan employee Andrew Dunn later remembered. “It was enough to knock you out by itself.” The blast derailed a streetcar a block over and sent debris soaring as high as the 34th floor of the nearby Equitable building. Pieces of the wagon’s ill-fated horse landed hundreds of yards away. Stockbroker Joseph P. Kennedy, father of future President John F. Kennedy, was lifted clear off his feet by the concussion, as were many others.

Wall Street Bombing on September 16, 1920

Those closer to the wagon were consumed in pillars of flame or cut to pieces by the hundreds of pounds of metal fragments - most likely iron sash weights - that had been cruelly piled on top of the bomb to act as shrapnel.

“I saw the explosion, a column of smoke shoot up into the air and then saw people dropping all around me, some of them with their clothing afire”, a witness later told the New York Sun.

Next came a rain of glass from shattered windows, which drenched the streets and nearby offices. The inside of the Morgan building was raked by debris. One piece crushed the skull of 24-year-old clerk William Joyce as he sat at his desk.

To the many World War I veterans on hand, the devastation at ground zero was eerily reminiscent of a battlefield. Wall Street was rendered a no man’s land of spattered blood, broken glass and charred bodies. The air was thick with smoke and soot, and severed limbs littered the ground.

“Almost in front of the steps leading up to the Morgan bank was the mutilated body of a man”, wrote reporter George Weston, who had escaped injury by ducking into a doorway. “Other bodies, most of them silent in death, lay nearby. As I gazed horror stricken at the site, one of these forms, half-naked and seared with burns, started to rise. It struggled, then toppled and fell lifeless into the gutter.”

Wall Street Bombing on September 16, 1920

Trading at the Stock Exchange ground to a halt, and some 2,000 New York City policemen and Red Cross nurses converged on Wall Street to comb through the wreckage. The initial explosion had killed 30 men and women, and another eight would later die from their wounds. Hundreds more were injured, many of them burned or maimed by flying glass and shrapnel.

The attack would remain the deadliest terrorist incident on U.S. soil until the Oklahoma City bombing 75 years later, yet investigators initially struggled to explain who had carried it out or why. The obvious target was the Morgan bank, which some critics claimed had profited off the horrors of World War I, but most of the wagon bomb’s victims were lowly stenographers and clerks - not wealthy businessmen. J.P. Morgan, Jr. himself had been thousands of miles away in Europe when the dynamite went off.

“There was no objective except general terrorism”, wrote the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. “The bomb was not directed against any particular person or property. It was directed against a public, anyone who happened to be near or any property in the neighborhood.”

Wall Street Bombing on September 16, 1920

With the first Red Scare still in full swing, most of the finger pointing soon centered on anti-capitalist communist and anarchist groups, which had been blamed for dozens of other bombings dating back to the 19th century. Suspicions only grew on September 17, when postal workers found a stack of flyers that had been dropped in Financial District mailboxes just minutes before the blast.

“Remember”, they read, “we will not tolerate any longer. Free the political prisoners, or it will be sure death for all of you. American Anarchist Fighters.”

The letters bore a striking resemblance to those circulated after an earlier terror campaign from June 1919, when bombs went off in several U.S. cities. Police had since credited that plot to the Galleanists, a gang of anti-government Italian anarchists led by a rousing orator and explosives guru named Luigi Galleani. Galleani had been deported the previous year, but many aspects of the Wall Street bomb - particularly the use of iron weights as shrapnel - matched the “infernal machines” that he and his followers had crafted in the past.

Unfortunately for the authorities, the mysterious fliers were the closest anyone ever came to claiming responsibility for the attack. Police and agents from the Bureau of Investigation (later the FBI) spent over three years trying to crack the case and identify the wagon’s driver, but the Galleanist trail went cold, as did dozens of others involving everyone from trade unionists to the American communist party and even Vladimir Lenin himself.

One of the stranger dead ends concerned Edward Fischer, a mentally unstable tennis champion who had warned people to stay away from Wall Street in the days preceding the attack. Once investigators learned that Fischer had issued several previous Wall Street warnings - each one of them supposedly received “through God and the air” - they dropped him as a suspect and committed him to a psychiatric ward.

Wall Street Bombing on September 16, 1920

The last official inquiry into the Wall Street attack took place in 1944, when the FBI reopened the decades-old cold case and concluded the explosion was likely the work of “Italian anarchists or Italian terrorists”. Other investigators have since pointed to a Galleanist named Mario Buda as the most likely culprit.

Buda was an associate of the famed anarchists Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti, and he may have engineered the Wall Street attack as revenge for their September 11, 1920 indictment for murder in a robbery gone wrong. Buda fled to Italy shortly after the bombing, however, and remained there until his death. Neither he nor anyone else was ever charged with the September 16 attack.

Wall Street reopened only a day after the deadly explosion, “determined”, wrote the New York Sun, “to show the world that business will proceed as usual despite bombs”. Bandaged office clerks returned to their desks, and all signs of the blast were covered up or swept away - including many pieces of evidence that might have helped in the police investigation.

That afternoon, thousands of New Yorkers descended on the scene of the disaster and joined in renditions of “America the Beautiful” and the national anthem. Looming behind them was the Morgan building, its marble edifice marred by fist-deep holes from bomb shrapnel. The scars are still visible on the building today - the lone monument to an unsolved crime that claimed 38 lives.

History Channel / Wikipedia / Encyclopedia Britannica / FBI.gov / Library Of Congress.gov / PBS.org / Hagley.org/ / Homeland Security Digital Library.org / Wall Street Bombing on September 16, 1920 (YouTube) video

“This Day in History”

This Day in History September 16

• 1620 Pilgrims set sail from England on the Mayflower.

• 1776 American Revolutionary War: Battle of Harlem Heights.

• 1779 American Revolutionary War: The Franco-American Siege of Savannah begins.

• 1810 Mexico's fight for independence from Spain: begins.

• 1893 Land Run of 1893: Settlers make a land run for prime land in the Cherokee Strip in Oklahoma.

• 1908 General Motors Corporation is founded.

• 1940 World War II: Italian invasion of Egypt: Italian troops conquer Sidi Barrani.

• 1943 World War II: Operation Avalanche: The German Tenth Army reports that it can no longer contain the Allied bridgehead around Salerno.

• 1945 World War II: Japanese occupation of Hong Kong: comes to an end.

• 1955 Zulu-class submarine becomes the first to launch a ballistic missile.

• 1976 Armenian champion swimmer Shavarsh Karapetyan saves 20 people from a trolleybus that had fallen into a Yerevan reservoir.


Understanding Military Terminology: At the Marine Corps Museum: Norman Rockwell's “The War Hero”

Understanding Military Terminology

Paramilitary forces

(DOD) Forces or groups distinct from the regular armed forces of any country, but resembling them in organization, equipment, training, or mission.

Joint Publications (JP 3-24) Counterinsurgency

Partial mobilization

Expansion of the active Armed Forces resulting from action by Congress (up to full mobilization) or by the President (not more than 1,000,000 for not more than 24 consecutive months) to mobilize Ready Reserve Component units, individual reservists, and the resources needed for their support to meet the requirements of a war or other national emergency involving an external threat to the national security.

Joint Publications (JP 4-05) Joint Mobilization Planning

Partner nation

A nation that the United States works with in a specific situation or operation.

Also called PN.

Joint Publications (JP 1) Doctrine for the Armed Forces of the United States


“The Odyssey”

The Old Salt’s Corner

“The Odyssey”

Book XIX

Ulysses was left in the cloister, pondering on the means whereby with Minerva's help he might be able to kill the suitors. Presently he said to Telemachus, “Telemachus, we must get the armour together and take it down inside. Make some excuse when the suitors ask you why you have removed it. Say that you have taken it to be out of the way of the smoke, inasmuch as it is no longer what it was when Ulysses went away, but has become soiled and begrimed with soot. Add to this more particularly that you are afraid Jove may set them on to quarrel over their wine, and that they may do each other some harm which may disgrace both banquet and wooing, for the sight of arms sometimes tempts people to use them.”

Telemachus approved of what his father had said, so he called nurse Euryclea and said, “Nurse, shut the women up in their room, while I take the armour that my father left behind him down into the store room. No one looks after it now my father is gone, and it has got all smirched with soot during my own boyhood. I want to take it down where the smoke cannot reach it.”

“I wish, child”, answered Euryclea, “that you would take the management of the house into your own hands altogether, and look after all the property yourself. But who is to go with you and light you to the store room? The maids would have so, but you would not let them.”

“The stranger”, said Telemachus, “shall show me a light; when people eat my bread they must earn it, no matter where they come from.”

“The Odyssey” - Book XIX continued ...

~ Homer

Written 800 B.C.E

Translated by Samuel Butler

“The Odyssey” - Table Of Contents


“I’m Just Sayin’”

“I’m Just Sayin”

“A person who won't read has no advantage over one who can't read.”

“Go to Heaven for the climate,

Hell for the company.”

“Of all the animals,

man is the only one that is cruel.

He is the only one who inflicts pain for the pleasure of doing it.”

~ Mark Twain


“Thought for the Day”

“Thought for the Day”

“You will soon break the bow if you keep it always stretched.”

“We tend to get what we expect.”

“If you put off everything till you're sure of it,

you'll never get anything done.”

“Empty pockets never held anyone back.

Only empty heads and empty hearts can do that.”

~ Norman Vincent Peale


“What I Have Learned”

“What I Learned”

“Life is like a grindstone:

Whether it grinds you down or polishes you up depends on what you’re made of.”

“More people would learn from their mistakes

if they weren’t so busy denying that they made them.”

~ Anonymous


Who Is “The Real McCoy”? Mr. Answer Man Please Tell Us: Who Is “The Real McCoy”?

This Prolific Inventor Helped Give Us The Phrase “The Real McCoy”

There are many stories about how we got this phrase. But there was only one Elijah McCoy - the real McCoy. Maybe.

The inventor held 57 United States patents, mostly related to the railway. His inventions, which were not headline-making outside the field of steam engines, were so associated with quality and good function that people began using “the real McCoy” to refer to quality products.

Like many other black inventors, McCoy faced racism and exclusion in his work, but his lengthy career was a successful one.

McCoy was born on this day in 1843 to George and Emilia McCoy, former slaves from Kentucky who had escaped to Canada on the Underground Railroad. After living in Ontario for several years, the family moved to Detroit following the Civil War. Elijah was educated in the city and in Edinburgh, Scotland.

He eventually came back to the States and ended up working for the Michigan Central Railroad. Although McCoy was educated as an engineer, writes the Canadian Railway Hall of Fame, the discriminatory management of the railroad thought a black man couldn’t be an engineer, and he was hired to work in the boiler room of trains as a fireman.

Who Is “The Real McCoy”?

Then in 1872, McCoy invented and patented an automatic oiling device for the moving parts of steam locomotives, colloquially known as the “oil-drip cup”.

“McCoy’s patented device was quickly adopted by the railroads, by those who maintained steamship engines and many others who used large machinery”, writes the University of Michigan. “The device was not particularly complicated so it was easy for competitors to produce similar devices. However, McCoy’s device was an original development and, apparently, had the best reputation.” That may well have been how the phrase “the real McCoy” became popular, the university writes.

McCoy used some of the money from ventures associated with his first patent to continue inventing, coming up with mostly railway-related inventions but also an improved ironing board. He moved to Detroit from Ypsilanti, Michigan, in 1882 with Mary McCoy, his wife, the railway hall of fame writes, where he consulted for firms and continued to come up with ideas.

When he was 72 years old, in 1916, he patented the “graphite lubricator” which was a mixture of graphite and oil that worked well in the period’s “superheater” locomotives, but he didn’t establish his own company to make some of his inventions until 1920. Unfortunately, he was greatly injured in a 1922 accident that also killed his wife, and, writes the railway hall of fame, he died in 1929 after suffering financial, physical and mental problems.

In recent years, McCoy’s legacy was honored when he was inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame, and when a patent office in Detroit was named after him. But his most widely known legacy—the “real McCoy” phrase - is less certain. Although some modern sources have attributed the phrase to him, the Canadian encyclopedia says the phrase’s origin story is unclear.

“Many have suggested that the phrase became common parlance among mechanical engineers who refused to install knockoff lubricators onto their locomotives, demanding instead the original McCoy design. However, parallel mythologies surround a number of other figures of the late 19th and early 20th century.”

There’s Charlie “Kid” McCoy and Joseph McCoy and G. MacKay and Co., a distiller which used “the real Mackay” as a promotional slogan. Maybe the most generous interpretation is to say they were all the real thing.

Smithsonian / Wikipedia / Biography / Mental Floss / Quora / Invent.org / Who Is “The Real McCoy”? (YouTube) video


NAVSPEAK aka U.S. Navy Slang - U.S. Navy

NAVSPEAK aka U.S. Navy Slang

Patrol Sock: See “ Cruise sock”.

P.B.: Short for Pacific Beach, California, suburb of San Diego.

P.C.O.D.: “Pussy Cut Off Day:” The last day of a long deployment on which male sailors can get laid and still obtain Venereal Disease cures from the Hospital Corpsman, and have those cures be effective, before returning to their partners at home.

PCU: Pre Commissioning Unit: What a ships company is called before a ship is commissioned. These personnel go on to become Plank Owners.

PD-8: Fictitious valve requested to be found by junior sailor in order for an engineering qualification to be signed off. Valves are named with the initials of the system they belong to, ie Seawater valve 1 is SW-1. PD-8 is actually a chemical additive used in the evaporator to aid distillation of fresh water. As opposed to other in-joke shipboard goose chases, this one can go one for weeks while the nub spends his free time poking around the distillation plant.

Wiktionary.org


Just for MARINES - The Few. The Proud.

Just for you MARINE

Passed over: Having failed selection for the next higher rank (for SNCOs and officers).

Pay Grade: DOD system of designating a U.S. serviceperson's pay (E-1 through E-9, W-1 through W-5, and O-1 through O-10), not to be confused with rank (though the two usually correspond) or billet.

Wikipedia.org


Naval Aviation Squadron Nicknames

Naval Aviation Squadron Nicknames

HT-18 Helicopter Training (HT) Squadron EIGHTTEEN - nicknamed the “Vigilant Eagles”

United States Navy Naval Air Station - United States Navy Helicopter Training Squadron, Naval Air Station Whiting Field Milton, Florida / Marine Corps and U. S. Coast Guard Student Naval Aviators / Lineage: HT-18: March 1, 1972 - present.


Where Did That Saying Come From

Where Did That Saying Come From?

Where Did That Saying Come From? “See a pin and pick it up, all the day you'll have good luck”

See a pin and pick it up, all the day you'll have good luck:

Meaning: A proverb extolling the virtue of thrift.

History: 'See a pin and pick it up, all the day you'll have good luck' is an old proverbial phrase and is included in collections of early nursery rhymes in its full form:

“See a pin and pick it up, all the day you'll have good luck;”

“See a pin and let it lie, bad luck you'll have all day.”

...although it is difficult to imagine children singing this in the playground with much conviction.

It covers the same ground as 'take care of the pence and the pounds will take care of themselves', i.e. an encouragement to believe that thrift in small things will bring a reward.

On 2nd January 1667 Samuel Pepys made this entry in his diary:

This day, at White Hall, I overheard Sir W. [William] Coventry propose to the King his ordering of some particular thing in the Wardrobe, which was of no great value; but yet, as much as it was, it was of profit to the King and saving to his purse. The King answered to it with great indifferency, as a thing that it was no great matter whether it was done or no. Sir W. Coventry answered:

“I see your Majesty do not remember the old English proverb, ‘He that will not stoop for a pin, will never be worth a pound.”

This shows that the idea, if not the precise current wording, was a known to be an old proverb by the 17th century.

Phrases.org UK


Science & Technology

Science & Technology

Science & Technology

After criticism, federal officials to revisit policy for reviewing risky virus experimentsIndustry says voluntary plan to curb antibiotic pollution is working, but critics want regulationWatch how scientists are attempting to replace the ubiquitous chemical BPA in food and drink cansTop stories: A push to build affordable electron microscopes, coronavirus is not a global emergency yet, and the voice of an ancient mummy Science AAAS

Collaborative simultaneous localization and mapping technique uses available Wi-Fi networksAssessing risk of chemicals to wildlife is huge challenge that requires new approachResearchers use chicken poop to dope graphene to make a pointWaves of ice inside a droplet Phys.org / MedicalXpress / TechXplore


Bizarre News (we couldn’t make up stuff this good – real news story)

Bizarre News (we couldn’t make up stuff this good - real news story)

Mars' water was mineral-rich and salty

Mars' water was mineral-rich and salty

Source: Tokyo Institute of Technology

Summary: Presently, many scientists believe Mars is the best candidate in the search for life beyond Earth because it is relatively nearby and there is good evidence that liquid water flowed on Mars' surface billions of years ago. A new study provides evidence that some early Martian minerals were formed in watery environments that were salty and near neutral pH, similar to Earth's modern oceans, and thus habitable for microbes.

Mars is at the top of this list for two reasons:

First, it is relatively close to Earth compared to the moons of Saturn and Jupiter (which are also considered good candidates for discovering life beyond Earth in the solar system, and are targeted for exploration in the coming decade).

Second, Mars is extremely observable because it lacks a thick atmosphere like Venus, and so far, there are pretty good evidence that Mars' surface temperature and pressure hovers around the point liquid water - considered essential for life - can exist. Further, there is good evidence in the form of observable river deltas, and more recent measurements made on Mars' surface, that liquid water did in fact flow on Mars billions of years ago.

Scientists are becoming increasingly convinced that billions of years Mars was habitable. Whether it was in fact inhabited, or is still inhabited, remains hotly debated. To better constrain these questions, scientists are trying to understand the kinds of water chemistry that could have generated the minerals observed on Mars today, which were produced billions of years ago.

Mars' water was mineral-rich and salty

Salinity (how much salt was present), pH (a measure of how acidic the water was), and redox state (roughly a measure of the abundance of gases such as hydrogen [H2, which are termed reducing environments] or oxygen [O2, which are termed oxidising environments; the two types are generally mutually incompatible]) are fundamental properties of natural waters.

As an example, Earth's modern atmosphere is highly oxygenated (containing large amounts of O2), but one need only dig a few inches into the bottom of a beach or lake today on Earth to find environments which are highly reduced.

Recent remote measurements on Mars suggest its ancient environments may provide clues about Mars' early habitability.

Specifically, the properties of pore water within sediments apparently deposited in lakes in Gale Crater on Mars suggest these sediments formed in the presence of liquid water which was of a pH close to that of Earth's modern oceans.

Earth's oceans are of course host to myriad forms of life, thus it seems compelling that Mars' early surface environment was a place contemporary Earth life could have lived, but it remains a mystery as to why evidence of life on Mars is so hard to find.

Science Daily (01/21/2020) video


© CEASAR CHOPPY by cartoonist Marty Gavin - archives Ceasar Choppy's Navy! “© CEASAR CHOPPY” by Marty Gavin

SONG FACTS

“Silver Threads and Golden Needles” - The Springfields 1962

“Silver Threads and Golden Needles” - The Springfields (Dusty Springfield)
Album: Silver Threads and Golden Needles
Released 1962 video

Silver Threads and Golden Needlesvideo The Springfields were a Peter, Paul & Mary-style folk trio of Dusty Springfield (later a solo star), her brother Tom, and their friend Tim Field.

Silver Threads and Golden Needlesvideo was originally recorded by Wanda Jackson in 1956 - it was the first single for the rockabilly singer. The Springfields heard Jackson's version and recorded their own. Their version is an early example of folk-pop, complete with a jangly guitar solo.

This song was written by Dick Reynolds and Jack Rhodes. Rhodes wrote some popular rockabilly and country song, including “A Satisfied Mindvideo.

Some of the many artists to cover this song include:

Wanda Jackson (1956) video

The Everly Brothers video

The The Seekers video

Jody Miller (#54, 1965) video

The Cowsills (#74, 1969) video

Johnny Cash video

Linda Ronstadt (#67, 1974) video

The Springfields released the successful singles “Breakawayvideo and “Bambinovideo in the UK before issuing “Silver Threads and Golden Needles” there in April 1962. It was a flop there, but when it was released in America as their first single in July 1962, it became a Stateside hit. When the album was released in the U.S., it was named after this track, but in the UK it was called Kinda Folksy.

Dusty Springfield, official website / Rock and Roll Hall of Fame / Billboard / All Music / Song Facts / The Springfields Dusty Springfield Documentary; video

Image: “Silver Threads and Golden Needles (album)” by The Springfields


Trivia

Trivia

● What device does Harry Potter use to track the comings and goings of people at Hogwarts castle?

Answer to Trivia

● How many honeybees does it take to make one teaspoon of honey?

Answer to Trivia

● What is Prosciutto?

Answer to Trivia

● “The 10 days that shook the world” refers to what country’s revolution?

Answer to Trivia


Jeopardy

A Test for People Who Know Everything

From the Jeopardy Archives Category - “PRO FOOTBALL HALL OF FAMERS BY TEAM” ($200)

“Franco Harris & Terry Bradshaw.”

Answer for People Who Do Not Know Everything, or Want to Verify Their Answer NFL

From the Jeopardy Archives Category - “PRO FOOTBALL HALL OF FAMERS BY TEAM” ($400)

“Terrell Davis & John Elway.”

Answer for People Who Do Not Know Everything, or Want to Verify Their Answer NFL

From the Jeopardy Archives Category - “PRO FOOTBALL HALL OF FAMERS BY TEAM” ($600)

“Michael Strahan & Frank Gifford.”

Answer for People Who Do Not Know Everything, or Want to Verify Their Answer NFL

From the Jeopardy Archives Category - “PRO FOOTBALL HALL OF FAMERS BY TEAM” ($800)

“Brian Urlacher & Walter Payton.”

Answer for People Who Do Not Know Everything, or Want to Verify Their Answer NFL

From the Jeopardy Archives Category - “PRO FOOTBALL HALL OF FAMERS BY TEAM” ($1,000)

“Randy White & Emmitt Smith.”

Answer for People Who Do Not Know Everything, or Want to Verify Their Answer NFL


Answer to Last Week's Test

From the Jeopardy Archives Category - “MORE COWBELL” ($200)

“In an 'SNL' skit, '(Don't Fear) The Reaper' was the song on which this man was playing a mean cowbell.”

● Answer: Will Ferrell. YouTube

From the Jeopardy Archives Category - “MORE COWBELL” ($400)

'

“Cowbell starts off 'Honky Tonk Women' by this band, which I want you to gimmay, gimmay, gimmay.”

● Answer: The Rolling Stones. YouTube

From the Jeopardy Archives Category - “MORE COWBELL” ($600)

“This rap trio from Brooklyn - as in 'No Sleep Till...' - threw in a cowbell solo on 'Hey Ladies'.”

● Answer: The Beastie Boys. YouTube

From the Jeopardy Archives Category - “MORE COWBELL” ($800)

“Tom Fogerty said, 'Man, that sure sounds good when the cowbell comes in' as this band recorded 'Born On The Bayou'.”

● Answer: Creedence Clearwater Revival (or CCR). YouTube

From the Jeopardy Archives Category - “MORE COWBELL” ($1,000)

“'Rock on, gold dust woman, take your silver spoon, dig your grave', sang this cowbell-employing band.”

● Answer: Fleetwood Mac. YouTube


Joke of the Day

Joke of the Day

Joke of the Day

“LAWYER JOKES”

How does an attorney sleep? Well, first he lies on one side, then he lies on the other.

You’ve heard that one, along with a million other lawyer jokes that people have sprung on you from the moment you first announced you were going to school to be a paralegal. Some of them probably even get told around the law office. Even lawyers like to laugh and there are a lot of aspects of legal practice that are ripe for a little deadpan humor.

ParalegalEDU.org

Joke of the Day

“Bad Job”

A judge was sentencing criminal defendants, when the judge saw a vaguely familiar face.

The judge reviewed his record and found that the man was a career criminal, except for a five-year period in which there were no convictions.

“Milton”, the judge asked, puzzled, “How is it you were able to stay out of trouble for those five years?”.

“I was in prison” Milton asswered. “You should know that—you were the one who sent me there.”

“That’s not possible”, the judge said. “I wasn’t even a judge then.”

“No, you weren’t the judge.”, the defendant countered, smiling mischievously. “You were my lawyer.”