Old Sailors' Almanac

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY

Week 34, 2020

Previous Week   August 17, 2020 - August 23, 2020  Next Week

Old Ironsides earns its name on August 19, 1812

Old Ironsides earns its name on August 19, 1812

Old Ironsides earns its name: During the War of 1812, the U.S. Navy frigate Constitution defeats the British frigate Guerrière in a furious engagement off the coast of Nova Scotia. Witnesses claimed that the British shot merely bounced off the Constitution‘s sides, as if the ship were made of iron rather than wood. By the war’s end, “Old Ironsides” destroyed or captured seven more British ships. The success of the USS Constitution against the supposedly invincible Royal Navy provided a tremendous boost in morale for the young American republic.

The Constitution was one of six frigates that Congress requested be built in 1794 to help protect American merchant fleets from attacks by Barbary pirates and harassment by British and French forces. It was constructed in Boston, and the bolts fastening its timbers and copper sheathing were provided by the industrialist and patriot Paul Revere. Launched on October 21, 1797, the Constitution was 204 feet long, displaced 2,200 tons, and was rated as a 44-gun frigate (although it often carried as many as 50 guns).

Old Ironsides earns its name on August 19, 1812

In July 1798 it was put to sea with a crew of 450 and cruised the West Indies, protecting U.S. shipping from French privateers. In 1803, President Thomas Jefferson ordered the American warship to the Mediterranean to fight Barbary pirates off the coast of Tripoli. The vessel performed commendably during the conflict, and in 1805 a peace treaty with Tripoli was signed on the Constitution‘s deck.

When war broke out with Britain in June 1812, the Constitution was commanded by Isaac Hull, who served as lieutenant on the ship during the Tripolitan War. Scarcely a month later, on July 16, the Constitution encountered a squadron of five British ships off Egg Harbor, New Jersey. Finding itself surrounded, the Constitution was preparing to escape when suddenly the wind died. With both sides dead in the water and just out of gunnery range, a legendary slow-speed chase ensued. For 36 hours, the Constitution‘s crew kept their ship just ahead of the British by towing the frigate with rowboats and by tossing the ship’s anchor ahead of the ship and then reeling it in. At dawn on July 18, a breeze sprang, and the Constitution was far enough ahead of its pursuers to escape by sail.

Old Ironsides earns its name on August 19, 1812

One month later, on August 19, the Constitution caught the British warship Guerrière alone about 600 miles east of Boston. After considerable maneuvering, the Constitution delivered its first broadside, and for 20 minutes the American and British vessels bombarded each other in close and violent action. The British man-of-war was de-masted and rendered a wreck while the Constitution escaped with only minimal damage. The unexpected victory of Old Ironsides against a British frigate helped unite America behind the war effort and made Commander Hull a national hero. The Constitution went on to defeat or capture seven more British ships in the War of 1812 and ran the British blockade of Boston twice.

After the war, Old Ironsides served as the flagship of the navy’s Mediterranean squadron and in 1828 was laid up in Boston. Two years later, the navy considered scrapping the Constitution, which had become unseaworthy, leading to an outcry of public support for preserving the famous warship. The navy refurbished the Constitution, and it went on to serve as the flagship of the Mediterranean, Pacific, and Home squadrons. In 1844, the frigate left New York City on a global journey that included visits to numerous international ports as a goodwill agent of the United States. In the early 1850s, it served as flagship of the African Squadron and patrolled the West African coast looking for slave traders.

In 1855, the Constitution retired from active military service, but the famous vessel continued to serve the United States, first as a training ship and later as a touring national landmark.

History Channel / Wikipedia / Encyclopedia Britannica / Naval History and Heritage Command.mil / USS Constitution Museum.org / Battlefields.org / National Parks Service / Old Ironsides earns its name on August 19, 1812 (YouTube) video

“This Day in History”

This Day in History August 19

• 1666 Second Anglo-Dutch War: Holmes's Bonfire: Rear Admiral Robert Holmes leads a raid on the Dutch island of Terschelling, destroying 150 merchant ships.

• 1692 Salem witch trials: In Salem, Province of Massachusetts Bay, five people, one woman and four men, including a clergyman, are executed after being convicted of witchcraft.

• 1745 Second Jacobite Rebellion: Prince Charles Edward Stuart raises his standard in Glenfinnan, known as “the 45”.

• 1745 Ottoman–Persian War: Battle of Kars: Ottoman army is routed by Persian forces led by Nader Shah.

• 1759 Seven Years' War: Battle of Lagos: Naval battle between Great Britain and France.

• 1782 American Revolutionary War: Battle of Blue Licks: The last major engagement of the war, almost ten months after the surrender of the British commander Charles Cornwallis following the Siege of Yorktown.

• 1854 American Indian Wars: First Sioux War: Grattan massacre: begins when United States Army soldiers kill Lakota chief Conquering Bear and in return are massacred.

• 1909 The first automobile race at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

• 1934 The first All-American Soap Box Derbyis held in Dayton, Ohio.

• 1936 Moscow Trials: The Great Purge of the Soviet Union begins when the first of the Moscow Trials is convened.

• 1940 First flight of the B-25 Mitchell medium bomber.

• 1942 World War II: Operation Jubilee: The 2nd Canadian Infantry Division leads an amphibious assault by allied forces on Dieppe, France and fails. The operation was intended to develop and try new amphibious landing tactics for the coming full invasion in Normandy.

• 1944 World War II: Liberation of Paris: Paris, France rises against German occupation with the help of Allied troops.

• 1945 August Revolution: Viet Minh led by Ho Chi Minh take power in Hanoi, Vietnam.

• 1953 Cold War: 1953 Iranian coup d'état: CIA and MI6 help to overthrow the government of Mohammad Mosaddegh in Iran and reinstate the Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi.

• 1960 Cold War: In Moscow, Russia, Soviet Union, downed American U-2 pilot Francis Gary Powers s sentenced to ten years imprisonment by the Soviet Union for espionage.

• 1960 Sputnik program: Korabl-Sputnik 2: the Soviet Union launches the satellite with the dogs Belka and Strelka, 40 mice, two rats and a variety of plants.

• 1964 Syncom 3, the first geostationary communication satellite, was launched.

• 1991 Dissolution of the Soviet Union: August Coup: Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev is placed under house arrest while on holiday in the town of Foros, Ukraine.


Understanding Military Terminology: At the Marine Corps Museum: Norman Rockwell's “The War Hero”

Understanding Military Terminology

Overhead persistent infrared

(DOD) Those systems originally developed to detect and track foreign intercontinental ballistic missile systems.

See called OPIR.

Joint Publications (JP 3-02) Joint Doctrine for Amphibious Operations

Overpressure

The pressure resulting from the blast wave of an explosion referred to as “positive” when it exceeds atmospheric pressure and “negative” during the passage of the wave when resulting pressures are less than atmospheric pressure.

Joint Publications (JP 3-11) Operations in Chemical, Biological, Radiological


“The Odyssey”

The Old Salt’s Corner

“The Odyssey”

Book XV

But Minerva went to the fair city of Lacedaemon to tell Ulysses' son that he was to return at once. She found him and Pisistratus sleeping in the forecourt of Menelaus's house; Pisistratus was fast asleep, but Telemachus could get no rest all night for thinking of his unhappy father, so Minerva went close up to him and said:

“Telemachus, you should not remain so far away from home any longer, nor leave your property with such dangerous people in your house; they will eat up everything you have among them, and you will have been on a fool's errand. Ask Menelaus to send you home at once if you wish to find your excellent mother still there when you get back. Her father and brothers are already urging her to marry Eurymachus, who has given her more than any of the others, and has been greatly increasing his wedding presents. I hope nothing valuable may have been taken from the house in spite of you, but you know what women are- they always want to do the best they can for the man who marries them, and never give another thought to the children of their first husband, nor to their father either when he is dead and done with. Go home, therefore, and put everything in charge of the most respectable woman servant that you have, until it shall please heaven to send you a wife of your own. Let me tell you also of another matter which you had better attend to. The chief men among the suitors are lying in wait for you in the Strait between Ithaca and Samos, and they mean to kill you before you can reach home. I do not much think they will succeed; it is more likely that some of those who are now eating up your property will find a grave themselves. Sail night and day, and keep your ship well away from the islands; the god who watches over you and protects you will send you a fair wind. As soon as you get to Ithaca send your ship and men on to the town, but yourself go straight to the swineherd who has charge your pigs; he is well disposed towards you, stay with him, therefore, for the night, and then send him to Penelope to tell her that you have got back safe from Pylos.”

Then she went back to Olympus; but Telemachus stirred Pisistratus with his heel to rouse him, and said, “Wake up Pisistratus, and yoke the horses to the chariot, for we must set off home.”

But Pisistratus said, “No matter what hurry we are in we cannot drive in the dark. It will be morning soon; wait till Menelaus has brought his presents and put them in the chariot for us; and let him say good-bye to us in the usual way. So long as he lives a guest should never forget a host who has shown him kindness.”

“The Odyssey” - Book XV continued ...

~ Homer

Written 800 B.C.E

Translated by Samuel Butler

“The Odyssey” - Table Of Contents


“I’m Just Sayin’”

“I’m Just Sayin”

“No man needs a vacation so much as the man who has just had one.”

“The final proof of greatness lies in being able to endure criticism without resentment.”

“Do not take life too seriously.

You will never get out of it alive.”

~ Elbert Hubbard


“Thought for the Day”

“Thought for the Day”

“About all I can say for the United States Senate

is that it opens with a prayer and closes with an investigation.”

“Alexander Hamilton started the U.S. Treasury with nothing,

and that was the closest our country has ever been to being even.”

“There are three kinds of men.

The one that learns by reading.

The few who learn by observation.

The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves.”

~ Will Rogers


“What I Have Learned”

“What I Learned”

“The reason dogs have so many friends is because they wag their tails and not their tongues.”

“The easy way to teach children the value of money is to borrow from them.”

“Wisdom is divided into two parts:”

(a) having a great deal to say, and

(b) not saying it.”

~ Anonymous


When Does The New Decade Really Begin, 2020 or 2021? Mr. Answer Man Please Tell Us: When Does The New Decade Really Begin, 2020 or 2021?

There has been much debate about when the old decade ends and the new one begins. Some say this decade ends on December 31, 2019, and the start of the new one begins January 1, 2020. For others, the new decade doesn’t start until January 1, 2021; the old one concluding on December 31, 2020.

Which is correct? Do decades begin with the year ending in the numeral 1 and finish with a 0. For a decade to begin, we must start with the year ending with 1 (2021) and finish with 10, or so far as chronology is concerned, a year ending in 0 (2030).

For example, January 1, 2001, opened the 21st century and the start of the new millennium, just as the year 1 A.D. marked the beginning of the Christian era. Of course, many of us will remember the wild celebrations that were touched off at midnight on December 31, 1999. But was that a year too soon? Yes!

That fact was known even to comedian Jerry Seinfeld. And if at the stroke of midnight on December 31st, you think you’ll be celebrating the start of a new decade, guess again. As was the case 20 years ago, you’ll be one year early, for the new decade will actually start in the year 2021.

When Does The New Decade Really Begin, 2020 or 2021?

Calendrical Confusion

If you want to criticize anybody for this confusion, you can point the finger of blame at two men: Dionysius Exiguus, also known in some reference works as “Dennis the Short”, and the Northumbrian monk Bede, also known as the “Venerable Bede”.

Dionysius was born in what we now call Romania around the year 470 and was the first to suggest counting the passage of the years from the date of the birth of Jesus Christ; the beginning of the anno Domini (which means “Year of Our Lord” in Latin) era, or A.D.

According to the contemporary historians of the time, Jesus was born during the 28th year of the reign of the Roman Emperor, Caesar Augustus. There is, however, considerable confusion about exactly when Augustus’ reign began, so the year Dionysius called 1 A.D. was not accurately placed in history; in fact, most religious scholars now think that Jesus might actually have been born several years earlier.

When Dionysius finished his computations, he figured that the year Christ was living in was 525 A.D. But he never bothered to number the years prior to Christ’s birth.

We would have to wait until 731 A.D. when the Venerable Bede popularized the anno Domini era in Anglo-Saxon England and extended the counting of years before the birth of Christ - the “B.C. era”.

Most unfortunately, however, Bede did not account for the year zero in his calculations. So 1 A.D. was immediately preceded not by a 0, but by 1 B.C.

The Elevator Analogy

As an analogy, think of going into a building in which the ground floor is listed not as the first floor, but as the lobby. So the first floor is actually one flight above you.

So if you were to go into an elevator located in the lobby and wanted to go 10-flights up, you would actually end up on the ninth floor (if you were to assume that the lobby as the “zero” floor).

But if you assume the lobby as the ⌊first” floor and went 10-flights up, you would end up on the tenth floor.

In essence, on our calendars, 2021 is the equivalent of a “first-floor lobby”, and after going up ten flights (or years), we’ll arrive at the 10th floor. Or in this case, the year 2030 - when that decade ends./p>

Therefore, from a mathematical point of view, a new decade is still a year away, in the year 2021.

Farmers' Almanac / Wikipedia / Mental Floss / Quora / Forbes / When Does The New Decade Really Begin, 2020 or 2021? (YouTube) video


NAVSPEAK aka U.S. Navy Slang - U.S. Navy

NAVSPEAK aka U.S. Navy Slang

OPS: Operations Officer: Head of the Operations Department on board a ship or shore command. The Operations Officer is usually third in command behind the Captain and the Executive Officer.

OS trainer (derogatory): A large popsicle; so called because Operations Specialists are expected to “brown-nose” with officers more than other ratings.

Oscar: The buoyant dummy used during man-overboard drills. Named for the Oscar flag that is flown during a man overboard evolution. If a sailor is “nominated for an Oscar”, someone has suggested that sailor be thrown overboard.

Oscar Sierra: Radio brevity code for a nuclear weapons mishap. Supposedly from the first letters of the words “Oh Shit”.

Wiktionary.org


Just for MARINES - The Few. The Proud.

Just for you MARINE

OQR: Officer Qualification Record, a service record for officers, much like an enlisted Marine's Service Record Book.

OOB: Out Of Bounds, or straying into an area restricted from use by normal traffic, prohibited to Marines, or too far from base for a given liberty period.

OOD: Officer Of the Deck, or the senior Marine responsible for the patrol and security of a unit's garrison working spaces and sleeping quarters after working hours, usually responsible for subordinate sentries and acts as a guard commander. See also duty & firewatch.

Oscar Mike: On the Move, the names of the two NATO phonetic alphabet letters O and M, which stand for the phrase. Used on the radio and in shorthand to each other. See also NATO phonetic alphabet.

Wikipedia.org


Naval Aviation Squadron Nicknames

Naval Aviation Squadron Nicknames

HSM-77 Helicopter Maritime Strike (HSM) Squadron SEVEN SEVEN - nicknamed the “Saberhawks”

United States Navy Naval Air Station - Naval Air Facility, Atsugi, Japan / Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron - Squadron Lineage: HSL-47 September 25, 1987 - February, 1 2009 / HSM-77: February 1, 2009 - present.


Where Did That Saying Come From

Where Did That Saying Come From?

Where Did That Saying Come From? “Revenge is a dish best served cold”

Revenge is a dish best served cold:

Meaning: The proverbial phrase 'revenge is a dish best served cold' expresses the notion that vengeance is more satisfying when exacted some time after the harm that instigated it.

History: This proverbial saying certainly gets about a bit, both in time and space. It sounds as though it ought to be old, from Shakespeare or the like. Vengeance was a frequent theme of Tudor drama and several authors wrote about it. Francis Bacon coined at least three 'revenge' proverbs:

● Revenge is a kind of wild justice.

● A man that studieth revenge keeps his own wounds green.

● Revenge triumphs over death.

Nevertheless, the phrase isn't Tudor. A quick online search will yield confidently expressed views that “revenge is a dish best served cold” is a translation of the line “La vengeance est un plat qui se mange froide” from Pierre Choderlos de Laclos's epistolary novel Les Liaisons Dangereuses, 1782.

As that text doesn't appear in the novel, or any other work by de Laclos, the story appears to be a piece of impressively industrious folk etymology - not only a made up source, but made up in French [...and I understand from French correspondents that the ”froide” should be “froid” - not a mistake that de Laclos might have made].

The first example that I can find of the phrase is in the French author Eugène Sue's novel Memoirs of Matilda, which was translated into English by D. G. Osbourne and published in 1846:

“And then revenge is very good eaten cold, as the vulgar say.”

Where Did That Saying Come From? “Revenge is a dish best served cold”

The italics are from the text, which implies that the phrase was already in use when the novel was written. As always with translations, it is a moot point as to who can claim authorship of the proverb as an English phrase - the translator, who was the first to use the expression in English, or the original author.

Wherever it can be said to have originated, the proverb struck a chord in the English-speaking world. More recently, it has been called into use in three screen classics:

Kind Hearts and Coronets, 1949:

“Revenge is a dish which people of taste prefer to eat cold.”.

The Godfather, 1969:

Don Corleone nodded, “Revenge is a dish that tastes best when it is cold.”.

Star Trek II, The Wrath of Kahn, 1982:

Kirk, old friend, do you know the Klingon proverb, “Revenge is a dish best served cold.”.

Phrases.org UK


Science & Technology

Science & Technology

Science & Technology

Black hole transient GRS 1716−249 investigated in hard and intermediate statesPlanet WASP-12b is on a death spiral, say scientistsScientists develop way to track salmonella infection in real timeA mathematical model to describe spaghetti noodle curling when cooked Phys.org / MedicalXpress / TechXplore

Watch Russia, China, United States race to deploy ‘blazingly fast’ hypersonic weaponsTop stories: Hypersonic weapons, acid waters, and interstellar cometsMystery virus found in Wuhan resembles bat viruses but not SARS, Chinese scientist saysMRI scanners built for two push limits of neuroimaging Science AAAS


Bizarre News (we couldn’t make up stuff this good – real news story)

Bizarre News (we couldn’t make up stuff this good - real news story)

Astronomers find wandering massive black holes in dwarf galaxies

Astronomers find wandering massive black holes in dwarf galaxies

Source: National Radio Astronomy Observatory

Summary: Studies with the VLA indicate that roughly half of the massive black holes in dwarf galaxies are not in the centers of those galaxies. This gives astronomers new insights into the conditions in which similar black holes formed and grew in the early history of the universe.

Astronomers seeking to learn about the mechanisms that formed massive black holes in the early history of the Universe have gained important new clues with the discovery of 13 such black holes in dwarf galaxies less than a billion light-years from Earth.

These dwarf galaxies, more than 100 times less massive than our own Milky Way, are among the smallest galaxies known to host massive black holes. The scientists expect that the black holes in these smaller galaxies average about 400,000 times the mass of our Sun.

“We hope that studying them and their galaxies will give us insights into how similar black holes in the early Universe formed and then grew, through galactic mergers over billions of years, producing the supermassive black holes we see in larger galaxies today, with masses of many millions or billions of times that of the Sun”, said Amy Reines of Montana State University.

Reines and her colleagues used the National Science Foundation's Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) to make the discovery, which they are reporting at the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Honolulu, Hawaii.

Astronomers find wandering massive black holes in dwarf galaxies

Reines and her collaborators used the VLA to discover the first massive black hole in a dwarf starburst galaxy in 2011. That discovery was a surprise to astronomers and spurred a radio search for more.

The scientists started by selecting a sample of galaxies from the NASA-Sloan Atlas, a catalog of galaxies made with visible-light telescopes. They chose galaxies with stars totalling less than 3 billion times the mass of the Sun, about equal to the Large Magellanic Cloud, a small companion of the Milky Way. From this sample, they picked candidates that also appeared in the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty centimeters (FIRST) survey, made between 1993 and 2011.

They then used the VLA to make new and more sensitive, high-resolution images of 111 of the selected galaxies.

“The new VLA observations revealed that 13 of these galaxies have strong evidence for a massive black hole that is actively consuming surrounding material. We were very surprised to find that, in roughly half of those 13 galaxies, the black hole is not at the center of the galaxy, unlike the case in larger galaxies”, Reines said

Astronomers find wandering massive black holes in dwarf galaxies

The scientists said this indicates that the galaxies likely have merged with others earlier in their history. This is consistent with computer simulations predicting that roughly half of the massive black holes in dwarf galaxies will be found wandering in the outskirts of their galaxies.

“This work has taught us that we must broaden our searches for massive black holes in dwarf galaxies beyond their centers to get a more complete understanding of the population and learn what mechanisms helped form the first massive black holes in the early Universe”, Reines said.

Reines worked with James Condon, of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory; Jeremy Darling, of the University of Colorado, Boulder; and Jenny Greene, of Princeton University. The astronomers are publishing their results in the Astrophysical Journal.

The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

Science Daily (01/06/2020) video


© CEASAR CHOPPY by cartoonist Marty Gavin - archives Ceasar Choppy's Navy! “© CEASAR CHOPPY” by Marty Gavin

SONG FACTS

“When You Walk In The Room” - Jackie DeShannon 1963

“When You Walk In The Room” - Jackie DeShannon
Album: The Very Best Of Jackie DeShannon
Released 1963 video

When You Walk In The Roomvideo is an uptempo composition by a youthful Jackie DeShannon has one of the most recognisable riffs of the 1960s, on a par with “Smoke on the Watervideo.

A massive hit that has been covered by many artists from

The Searchers video

Agnetha Fältskog video

Status Quo video

Susanna Hoffs of The Bangles video

The original version of “When You Walk In The Roomvideo was released on the Liberty label November 23, 1963 as the B-side of “Till You Say You'll Be Minevideo. Produced by Dick Glasser, it runs to 2 minutes 35 seconds, and might have been buried because the day before its release the President of the United States was assassinated, and the day after it was released, the assassin was assassinated.

These two events would spawn a large number of songs including the contemporary “In The Summer Of His Yearsvideo and later “Dallas 1pmvideo and “Jack Rubyvideo to begin with. Fortunately, the Kennedy Assassination did not completely drown out all other news, and the song was picked up on the other side of the Atlantic.

The September 1964 cover by The Searchers which was backed by “I'll Be Missing Youvideo and reached #3 on the UK chart, #35 in the U.S.

In an October 2001 interview with Ken Paulson, Jackie DeShannon said it was still one of her favorites, a show opener, and timeless:

“I think we all have that spark when somebody walks in the room that we feel an emotional tie. That's how we feel.”

Jackie DeShannon, official website / Country Music Hall of Fame / Billboard / All Music / Song Facts / Jackie DeShannon

Image: “The Very Best Of Jackie DeShannon (album)” by Jackie DeShannon


Trivia

Trivia

● He ascended to the English throne in 1422, at the age of 9 months. During his reign, the War of the Roses occurred. He was a mild, honest, pious man, a patron of literature and the arts, and founder of Eton College. He was also mentally unstable and ultimately died young.

Answer to Trivia

● Who was Vassal King of Troy during the siege of Troy, and under which empire was it a vassal state?

Answer to Trivia

● Which city is identified with each of these women: a. Singer Diana Ross began recording in which city? b. Mother Theresa founded her religious order in which city? c. Opera character Carmen is mostly identified with which city?

Answer to Trivia

● What is the only month used in the NATO Phonetic Alphabet?

Answer to Trivia


Jeopardy

A Test for People Who Know Everything

From the Jeopardy Archives Category - “TOYS "R" US” ($200)

“A Hungarian professor designed the prototype of this puzzle in 1974; by the 1980s, it was a sensation.”

Answer for People Who Do Not Know Everything, or Want to Verify Their Answer Toy Hall of Fame.org

From the Jeopardy Archives Category - “TOYS "R" US” ($400)

“This smiling gal with yarn for hair was the subject of a U.S. patent issued in September 1915.”

Answer for People Who Do Not Know Everything, or Want to Verify Their Answer Toy Hall of Fame.org

From the Jeopardy Archives Category - “TOYS "R" US” ($600)

“Someone's block will be knocked off when the Blue Bomber takes on the Red Rocker in this 5-word game.”

Answer for People Who Do Not Know Everything, or Want to Verify Their Answer Mattel

From the Jeopardy Archives Category - “TOYS "R" US” ($800)

“In 1999 this classic toy wagon landed at the National Toy Hall of Fame.”

Answer for People Who Do Not Know Everything, or Want to Verify Their Answer Toy Hall of Fame.org

From the Jeopardy Archives Category - “TOYS "R" US” ($1,000)

“I got a brand new pair of Riedell 911 Jammer Jams, these.”

Answer for People Who Do Not Know Everything, or Want to Verify Their Answer Toy Hall of Fame.org


Answer to Last Week's Test

From the Jeopardy Archives Category - “LIVE 'LONG'” ($200)

“The current record in this event has lasted 24 years (29 feet, 4.4 inches).”

● Answer: The Long Jump. World Athletics.org

From the Jeopardy Archives Category - “LIVE 'LONG'” ($400)

'

“One degree of it is equal to about 69 miles at the equator.”

● Answer: Forbes. National Geographic.org

From the Jeopardy Archives Category - “LIVE 'LONG'” ($800)

“This literary character has a parrot named Cap'n Flint.”

● Answer: Long John Silver. Gutenberg.org

From the Jeopardy Archives Category - “PROSPER” ($800)

“He quit school at age 11 &, as a teen in 1810, bought his first boat; later, as a 'commodore', he'd be worth $100 million.”

● Answer: (Cornelius) Vanderbilt. New Netherland Institute.org

From the Jeopardy Archives Category - “PROSPER” ($1,000)

“In English the name of this Mexican magnate means thin, but his wallet is fat--he & his family are worth $75 billion.”

● Answer: Carlos Slim. Forbes


Joke of the Day

Joke of the Day

Joke of the Day

“LAWYER JOKES”

How does an attorney sleep? Well, first he lies on one side, then he lies on the other.

You’ve heard that one, along with a million other lawyer jokes that people have sprung on you from the moment you first announced you were going to school to be a paralegal. Some of them probably even get told around the law office. Even lawyers like to laugh and there are a lot of aspects of legal practice that are ripe for a little deadpan humor.

ParalegalEDU.org

Joke of the Day

“Frame of Reference”

When an 88-year-old Grandmother was called for jury duty, she had to submit to questioning by the opposing lawyers.

Plaintiff’s Lawyer: “Have you ever dealt with an attorney?”

Grandmother: “Yes. I had an attorney write my living trust.”

Plaintiff’s Lawyer: “And how did that turn out?”

Grandmother: “I don’t know.” - “Ask me when I’m dead.”